Tag Archives: recipes

Great British Bake Off recipes 2014 – BakingMad.com

The Great British Bake Off is back!

We are all giddy with excitement in the BakingMad.com offices that The Great British Bake Off is back! Find out how to replicate the recipes from the 2014 Great British Bake Off series, from cakes to bread, from showstoppers to technical challenges – let BakingMad.com guide you through them all. We are also here for support to stop you getting that dreaded soggy bottom, so check out our ‘How to’ video section as well as our FAQ’s and tips for extra support.

Throughout GBBO, we will be adding recipes here for you to try. We are told that tonight’s episode is all about the Great British cake, including cherry cake and a Swiss roll. So here are a few of recipes to get you started.

http://www.bakingmad.com/cherry-cake-recipe/

http://www.bakingmad.com/cherry-cakes-recipe/

http://www.bakingmad.com/cherry-and-pistachio-cake-recipe/

http://www.bakingmad.com/jam-filled-swiss-roll-recipe/

http://www.bakingmad.com/chocolate-and-vanilla-swiss-roll-recipe/

How to make Salted Caramel Ring Doughnuts

Some people think making doughnuts is too difficult, but our simple four step ‘how to’ will show you how!

 

You will need for these for the doughnuts:

500g self raising flour (we recommend Allinson)

1 tsp baking powder

90g golden caster sugar (we recommend Billington’s)

2 medium free range eggs

2 tbsp sunflower oil

200ml whole milk

 

You will need these for the topping:

110g Dark Muscovado sugar (we recommend Billington’s)

110g salted butter

1/2 tsp sea salt

175ml double cream

plus sea salt to decorate

 

1. To make the caramel sauce: Place the sugar, butter and salt in a saucepan and heat until the sugar has melted then add the cream and stir through. Bring this to the boil and simmer for 3 minutes until thick. Chill in the fridge for at least 2 hours.

2. Sift together the flour and baking powder into a bowl and stir in the sugar. Beat together the eggs, oil and milk then add to the dry ingredients. Mix together until a smooth dough forms.

3. Turn the dough onto a lightly floured surface and roll out to about 1cm thickness. Cut circles out of the dough using a floured cutter, then use a smaller cutter to cut out the centres.

4. In a deep saucepan heat some vegetable oil to about 170°C then fry the doughnuts 2-3 at a time by carefully placing in the oil for 3-4 minutes until they are golden brown on the bottom. Then turn them over and cook for a further 2-3 minutes until golden in colour and cooked through. Drain on kitchen paper. Finish the doughnuts by pouring over the caramel sauce and sprinkle over some flakes a sea salt.

These beauties are absolutely delicious warm, or you can keep them in an airtight container and eat within 1-2 days.

Enjoy!

 

Sam’s Sourdough Loaf

Following a recent move to my new home, I decided that it was a perfect opportunity to begin a new sourdough starter. Using the BakingMad.com starter recipe, I filled a large 1litre kilner jar with 70g flour and 70ml water, giving it a good whisk together with a mini whisk until all the lumps of flour had been dispersed. I left the sourdough in pride position in my warm kitchen and set my phone as a reminder to feed again the same time next day.

The following day I repeated the process, and perhaps due to the extreme warm weather, the starter was bubbling and increasing in size in no time. I found that due to the sealed lid on my kilner jar I felt the need to open it and let out some of the air pressure when I passed by it in the kitchen, as I had heard tales of monstrous sourdough starters that had built up excess C02 pressure and burst open!

By day 3 of feeding my sourdough it had begun to develop a rather unsavoury smell, which whilst perfectly normal for a starter, does make you want to reach for the air freshener! I took it as a sign that the starter was doing its sweet merry little thing and bubbles continue to produce following each feed.

Day 4/5 I noticed that the sourdough had appeared to separate with a liquid layer on the top. Some sources suggest that you pour away this top liquid and others say to mix back in with the starter. I must say that I tried both methods and both seemed to keep my sourdough starter ticking away nicely.

By day 6 the kilner jar was beginning to fill up near the top – in hindsight I think I probably needed a bigger jar than expected (perhaps a 1.5/2 litre). There was an unfortunate incident on this day when the starter decided to make an escape from the jar and run all over my new kitchen surfaces! That was the day the starter was nicknamed by the family as ‘The Beast’.

Day 7 and I couldn’t wait any longer to bake my first sourdough loaf . Before baking, I would recommend that you have a whole day spare, as unlike a standard loaf, sourdough takes an age to prove – but it is totally worth the wait believe me!

Over 6 hours later the dough was ready to be baked, so I scored the top with a knife and baked in two batches in the oven. Although the loaves were only small on this occasion, they certainly made up for it in flavour and the second loaf was given away to family members as a dinner gift.

I fed the starter again the next day to top it up a little and have stored it in the fridge now, with a view to feeding it once a week. I plan to bake another loaf next weekend before experimenting with other sourdough style recipes.

Whilst the sourdough starter can seem a bit high maintenance to begin with, it’s certainly worth the wait so give it a try!

Click here for our sourdough starter recipe

Click here for our Sourdough bread recipe


 

 

Make the most of Molasses

Molasses is a dark brown type of sugar made from sugar cane. It has a deep, strong flavour is attained through it’s high content of natural cane molasses.

Molasses is perfect to use in marinadeschutneys and pickles along with rich fruit cakesmincemeat and gingerbread. It adds a distinct deep and rich flavour to your baking that no other ingredient can match.

We recommend using unrefined natural cane molasses such as Billington’s. Unrefined sugar cane retains a natural locked in flavour and colour which refined brown sugar loses in the refining process. You can find Billington’s molasses in all major supermarkets.

Why not try the following recipes which include Molasses sugar and discover the incredible flavour for yourself?

Molasses is a great ingredient in sticky sauces and marinades.

Discover the depth it can add to your fruit cakes.

If you’d like any more tips and advice on using molasses simply leave your question below!

Happy Baking!

How to make Crystallised Rose Petals

Hi everyone,

Have you ever seen beautiful cakes and cupcakes decorated with delicate rose petals and wondered how it’s done? Well you can make your own crystallised rose petals yourself very easily. Just follow our step-by-step guide!

You will need:

  • 30 Rose Petals
  • 1 Egg White from a medium egg
  • Caster Sugar
  • Paintbrush
  • Teaspoon

1. Carefully remove the petals from the roses, lightly whisk the egg white and spoon the sugar into a shallow bowl.

2. Hold the base of a petal using the tip of your thumb and fore finger and paint both sides with the egg white, ensuring you cover the whole petal.

3. Spoon the sugar all over the petal, shaking off any excess

4. Place the petals on baking parchment and leave to dry for at least 2 hours or overnight if possible. The crystallised petals can be stored in an airtight container for up to 2 weeks.

And there you have it, pretty crystallised rose petals for decorating cakes and cupcakes. Why not try them out on this delicious Chocolate Cake with Rose Petals, or alternatively to top these delicate Rose Water Cupcakes.

Enjoy!

Sam’s Father’s Day Strawberry Jam

So this weekend I faced the annual dilemma of what to give my Dad who ‘has everything he needs and doesn’t want a fuss’ for Father’s Day… Well I came to the conclusion that there is nothing better than a homemade treat.

With the British summer a bit wet and dreary outside I thought I would bring the summer inside and make some delicious homemade strawberry jam using a recipe from BakingMad.com.

I had picked some fresh strawberries (1kg) and washed, hulled and dried them before blending them which released a gorgeous strawberry scent into my kitchen (tempting not to nibble on the remaining strawberries!).

I used jam sugar (1kg) and warmed it in the oven on a low temperature. At the same time I simmered the strawberries on a low heat on the hob, then mixed the pre-warmed sugar in. Keep stirring until sugar had fully dissolved, creating a strawberry syrup.

Once dissolved, I turned the heat up to a rolling boil. A good tip to add is that you should use a large pan to make your jam as it will froth up when boiling and you don’t want it to boil over making a mess!

I used a jam thermometer to test the temperature of the jam (105°c is ideal), but as an extra precaution also did the wrinkle test. To do this put a spoonful of the jam on a chilled saucer and push it gently with your finger. If the jam wrinkles on top then it is ready to pot (and is also a great excuse to have a sneaky taste of the jam).

When my jam was ready, I spooned it into sterilised jam jars quickly and sealed with a waxed disc. I managed to fill two 2lb jam jars, so not only did I have a yummy gift for my dad but also a reward for me too!

I decorated the jar with navy ribbon and a handmade ‘Fathers Day’ tag, and I must say I was really pleased with the outcome and my dad was over the moon. Now I have the great dilemma of whether to make scones or jam tarts with my leftover jam….hmmmmm the possibilities are endless!

Why not try out the recipe yourself here or any of our other jam recipes, or watch our handy video on how to make jam.

 

Nancy’s Chocolate Chip Pound Cakes

Hi everyone!

My friends and I are having a get together tonight and I’ve been tasked with making dessert. We’ve recently uploaded some fantastic Irish recipes from our Bake with the Best campaign, where BakingMad.com brings you traditional and delicious desserts from around all of the United Kingdom. The Chocolate Chip Pound Cakes caught my eye (mainly because they have Baileys in them), but also because of their diddy nature and therefore easy to share out at a party.

When shopping for the ingredients unfortunately I couldn’t find the mini loaf cases. Asda and Sainsburys stock them however my Asda must not be very good. Instead I made do with some dark brown coloured muffin cases, so they are really Choc Chip Muffins!

First of all you pre-heat the oven to 180C, fan 160C, gas 4. Then you cream together 150g light muscovado sugar, 150g golden caster sugar, 225g softened unsalted butter and 1 1/2 teaspoons of vanilla extract. I used Billington’s sugar and Nielsen-Massey vanilla extract so my cakes are extra delicious.

Gradually beat in three eggs (I used an electric whisk to do this, much quicker) then fold in the 300g self-raising flour, 1/2 teaspoon baking powder, 150ml single cream and 75ml Irish liqueur (otherwise known as Baileys). I had run out of self-raising flour so instead added 2 teaspoons of baking powder to 300g of plain flour and it worked fine!

The mixture looks a little wet at this point but keep mixing to make sure it is well combined.

Fold in 150g milk chocolate chips (yummmmm) then divide evenly between loaf cases or muffin cases. I managed to get 14 muffins from this mixture.

Place in the oven for 25-30 minutes until golden and springy to touch.

Leave the cakes to completely cool (which is difficult I know), then mix together about 100g of golden icing sugar (Billington’s do this type of icing sugar) with 3 tablespoons of Baileys. Scoop a little bit of icing with a tablespoon and drop in the centre of every muffin, leaving it to ooze out to the edges.

And there you have it. I snuck a muffin into work with me today to have with coffee, and I hate to say so myself but they are pretty damn good!

Check out the recipe here and let us know how it goes!

World Baking Day sponsored by Stork

 

 

 

 

 

 

Since its launch in 1920, Stork has established itself as one of the most trusted names in home baking.

Whether you’re baking cupcakes for tea with the girls, a light and fluffy Victoria sponge for a picnic or rustling up some delicious cookies, Stork contains just the right fat content for baking many types of cakes, biscuits, crumbles, puddings and pastries.

This month we are asking you to conquer a cake you’ve never baked before, for World Baking Day 2013, which takes place on Sunday 19th May.
The global event is sponsored by Stork and the theme for 2013 is to ‘Bake Brave’. From novice to master baker, food blogger to food celebrity, World Baking Day has been introduced to inspire people to step out of their baking comfort zone.

World Baking Day has collected 100 Bake Brave recipes (www.worldbakingday.co.uk) ranging in difficulty from ambassadors around the world; from Level 1 for a complete novice, up to Level 100 for a master baker. Check out the website or try your hand at some of our delicious Stork recipes. You could even win a Stork baking hamper packed full of baking goodies, just click here to enter!

 

Nancy makes Eric Lanlard’s Best Carrot Cake

Hi everyone, it’s me again.

As you’re probably all well aware we are currently in the middle of Series Two of Baking Mad with Eric Lanlard, on Channel 4 every weekday at 12.05pm. It’s been an exciting series so far with many delicious cakes and desserts being made. Some of our fabulous bloggers have been having a go at some of Eric’s recipes from the show so I thought why shouldn’t I have a go too!

I was torn between Erics Best Banana Cake and Erics Best Carrot Cake but in the end went for the carrot cake mainly because I didn’t have any ripe bananas and also because I LOVE carrot cake.

 

Eric’s Best Carrot Cake
(I halved the recipe because I only wanted to make one loaf)
3 Eggs  
175 grams Light Muscovado Sugar (Billington’s)  
200 ml Ground nut oil  
200 grams Self Raising Flour (Allinson Nature Friendly)  
1 tsp Cinnamon ground 
1 tsp Nutmeg ground 
200 grams Carrots grated 
100 grams Sultanas golden 
100 grams Walnuts roasted halves

For the icing:
125 grams Unsalted Butter  
50 grams Cream cheese  
300 grams Golden Icing Sugar (Billington’s) 

Handful of walnuts
Handful of sultanas

First of all preheat your oven to 150C. Grease a regular 25cmx11cm (10×4.25 inch) loaf tin with butter and line with baking paper

Add the light muscovado sugar and ground nut oil to a mixing bowl. Break 3 eggs and add to the mixture and whisk.

Grate the carrots into the bowl and mix. Add the walnuts and sultanas to the bowl and mix. (Eric suggested golden sultanas and I wasn’t too sure what they were so I just used regular)

In a seperate bowl sift in the flour, cinnamon and nutmeg. Fold the mixture until fully mixed.

Pour the mixture into the loaf tins. Cook in a preheated oven for 40-45 minutes. (I had to leave mine in for an extra ten minutes because it didn’t seem cooked yet, but my oven isn’t that great) 

Half way through cooking, use a sharp knife to cut lengthways along the top of the loaf to create a dome like effect. I thought this was a fab tip, I had never known that’s how you do it! 

Once cooked, remove from tins and allow to cool.

For the frosting, place the butter and cream cheese in a mixing bowl. Add in the icing sugar and 1tsp of vanilla extract and mix with a hand whisker. Decant the frosting into a bowl and pop in the fridge to firm up (but not for too long, my frosting became a bit too hard and was difficult to spread!)

When firm take a palette knife and holding the loaf in your hands spread the frosting on starting around the sides and then piling it high on top. Smooth over the frosting for an even finish. For the final touch, sprinkle golden sultanas and walnuts on the top and dust with icing sugar.

Ta-dah! I was quite happy with it!